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Predestination As Temporal Only

, posted by Kevin Jackson

Predestination As Temporal Only

From the Wesleyan Theological Journal
J. Kenneth Grider

One of the most interesting theological finds I have made in recent years is that God’s predestinating of us does not seem to have to do with eternal destiny.

God does indeed predestinate us in certain ways. Six times the word for “to predestinate” is used in the NT. Besides the instances of cognates of that very word “proorizo,” other “pro” words are found in both Testaments which also show that God makes pre-decisions on various matters. And God sometimes makes decrees, even as kings do, according to Scripture. But my recent study suggests that none of these references has to do with our eternal destiny, but only with other matters.

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The Nature of Wesleyan Theology

, posted by Kevin Jackson

The Nature of Wesleyan Theology

From the Wesleyan Theological Journal
J. Kenneth Grider

Theology, when it is entered into by us Wesleyans, takes on a certain nature, in relation to other theologies: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Anglican, Calvinist. It is of the very nature of Wesleyan theology that it has (1) an experiential interest, (2) an existential element, (3) a large-scoped biblical character, (4) a dynamic quality, (5) a catholicity, and 6) a homing instinct for the moral.

Its Experiential Interest

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JOHN WESLEY AND JONATHAN EDWARDS ON RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

, posted by Kevin Jackson

JOHN WESLEY AND JONATHAN EDWARDS ON RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE:
A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

From the Wesleyan Theological Journal
Robert Doyle Smith

Introduction

The tone of the eighteenth-century debate between Arminians and Calvinists finds apt description in John Wesley’s observation that to say, “This man is an Arminian,” was, to some, much the same thing as saying, “This man is a mad dog.”1

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John Fletcher’s Influence on the Development of Wesleyan Theology in America

, posted by Kevin Jackson

JOHN FLETCHER’S INFLUENCE ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF WESLEYAN THEOLOGY IN AMERICA

From the Wesleyan Theological Journal
By John A. Knight

Introduction

Not until recent years has the significance of John Fletcher’s theology been assessed by interpreters of the history of Christian doctrine. For almost two hundred years his work was eclipsed by the Wesleys and by some in the Calvinistic wing of the 18th century Evangelical Revival in England, except for occasional references by historians and biographers of his contemporaries.

David C. Shipley’s perceptive study, “Methodist Arminianism in the Theology of John Fletcher,” unpublished Ph. D. dissertation, Yale, 1942, was a pioneer work in this country. Particularly in the last two decades others have begun to recognize the importance of Fletcher to the development of Wesleyan theology.1

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Hermeneutical Model for the Wesleyan Ordo Salutis

, posted by Kevin Jackson

A HERMENEUTICAL MODEL FOR THE WESLEYAN ORDO SALUTIS

From the Wesleyan Theological Journal
Kenneth Collins

I. Introduction

It comes as a surprise to learn that in this age of ecumenism, John Wesley’s theology has rarely been explored beyond Methodist circles. Indeed, while significant dialogue has occurred among Lutheran, Calvinist and Roman Catholic traditions,1 Wesley’s voice has seldom been heard in such settings. Why has this been so?

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What Can The Dead in Sin Do?

, posted by Ben Henshaw

Calvinists love to point out that we are dead in sin. That we are dead in sin prior to conversion cannot be denied (Eph. 2:1, 5; Col. 2:13); the question has to do with what it means to be dead in sin.

Calvinist are fond of comparing spiritual death to physical death. This gives them the framework with which to press their theological conviction that regeneration precedes faith. If being dead in sin means that we are as helpless as physical corpses then we are told that we certainly can no more “hear” the gospel or “see” our need for Christ than a physical corpse can hear or see. But is there any justification for such a strict parallel between the spiritual and the physical?

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Is The Drawing of John 12:32 Universal or Particular?

, posted by Patron

Before examining some of the other Calvinists “proof texts” for irresistible regeneration, we will take a moment to deal with a common Calvinist objection to the Arminian appeal to Jn. 12:32 as an example of universal “drawing”.

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Review of Edwards’ Arguments Against LFW

, posted by Godismyjudge

This article defines Libertarian Free Will (LFW) and then reviews Jonathan Edwards’ arguments against LFW based both on causation and divine foreknowledge. DEFINITION OF LIBERTARIAN FREE WILL LFW is the idea that man is able…

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Friday Files, 30 Mar 18

, posted by K.W. Leslie

It’s the Good Friday edition of the Friday Files, SEA’s weekly rundown of stuff from the SEA archives, and relevant recent articles on Arminian/Calvinist issues. Inclusion on this page doesn’t guarantee SEA’s endorsement, no matter…

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Arminius on Pelagius

, posted by drwayman

“Free Will is unable to begin or to perfect any true and spiritual good without Grace. That I may not be said, like Pelagius, to practice delusion with regard to the word “Grace,” I mean…

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The Joy of the Remonstrance

, posted by Martin Glynn

On January 14th, 1610, several theologians met in the Hague to issue forth a statement of protest against the established order of the Reformed Church. This statement became a simple remonstrance, stating for clarification 5…

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The Five Articles of Remonstrance

, posted by Justin Moser

[This document was originally created about 1610 by the Remonstrants, the followers of Arminius, to outline the doctrines of the early Arminians. The Five Articles were condemned at the Synod of Dort in 1619]

Article 1

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God, Predestination & Foreknowledge

, posted by jeremyo1610

I recently heard someone say that God is watching and waiting, to see what we are going to do and what choices we will make. This person went on to say that because God is…

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