Recent Articles

Norman Geisler, Entry on “Free Will” in the Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics

, posted by SEA

This article was take from http://www.johnankerberg.org/Articles/theological-dictionary/TD1100W3.htm

Free Will
by Dr. Norman Geisler
(from Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics, Baker Books, 1999)

Concepts of the nature of human choice fall within three categories: determinism, indeterminism, and self-determinism. A determinist looks to actions caused by another, an indeterminist to uncaused actions, and a self-determinist to self-caused actions.

Determinism

There are two basic kinds of determinism: naturalistic and theistic. Naturalistic determinism is most readily identified with behavioral psychologist B. F. Skinner. Skinner held that all human behavior is determined by genetic and behavioral factors. Humans simply act according to what has been programmed into them.

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Scot McKnight–Taking It to the Neo-Reformed

, posted by SEA

Distinguished NT scholar and non-Calvinist, Scot McKnight, has been blogging about the most troubling element of the Calvinist resurgence, which he labels “the neo-Reformed”. Here are links to his first and second posts: http://blog.beliefnet.com/jesuscreed/2009/02/who-are-the-neoreformed.html http://blog.beliefnet.com/jesuscreed/2009/02/who-are-the-neoreformed-2.html…

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I’m Free and God Is Still Soveriegn

, posted by Martin Glynn

Over and over and over again I am told that I do not truly believe that God is sovereign. Sure, I think I believe it, but God cannot really be sovereign if He doesn’t minutely…

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The General Theory of Relativity and the Nature of God Pokes Openness in the Eye

, posted by Eric Landstrom

It is argued by proponents of Openness as well as Calvinists that claim Openness is the logical conclusion for Arminianism that in order for people to be free the future must be somehow open. Their argument claims that if God’s knowledge of future unactualized contingencies is perfectly known, then creaturely freedom is a farce and whether we like it or not, our Lord has effectively predestinated all of creation. Countering the argument Arminians point out that simply knowing for sure that a person will freely do something is not enough for God to control or predestinate the world. This is because foreknowledge of an event does not imply direct influence or omnicausality, or absolute determination, but merely knows what other wills are doing. In other words, foreknowledge doesn’t mean absolute determination. Yet a fine point should be sharpened at this time: God not only grasps and understands what actually will happen, but also what could happen under varied possible contingencies.

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Middle Knowledge

, posted by Richard Coords

Please click on the attachment to see Richard Coords’ post on Middle Knowledge.

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Friday Files: Clarke’s commentary on Romans 9

, posted by Godismyjudge

In Adam Clarke’s commentary on Romans 9, he argues for that God choice of Jacob and Esau were primarily national1, rather than the unconditional individual election and reprobation. The idea is that God chose to…

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Foreknowledge Defined

, posted by Kevin Jackson

Foreknowledge means “to have knowledge of something before it happens.” In Scripture there are are references to God’s foreknowledge of those who will believe in Jesus (Rom. 8:29; 1 Pet. 1:2). Those whom God foreknows,…

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Consistent Calvinism FAQ (Satire)

, posted by neborg

Disclaimer: The following is a light-hearted satire on Calvinism and not an attack on Calvinists. 🙂 Q. How should I approach evangelism? A. You should evangelise if you believe that you are included in the…

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Atonement for All

, posted by TrueHope

Jesus Christ died on the cross as a provision for all people, so that there is forgiveness of sins for all who believe, even though many are not forgiven because they refuse to believe. Jesus…

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According to Scripture, Jesus Died For …

, posted by Kevin Jackson

According to scripture, Jesus died for … Us all (Isaiah 53:6) His people (Matthew 1:21) All who are weary (Matthew 11:28) Many (Matthew 20:28) His people (Luke 1:68) All the people (Luke 2:10) The lost…

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I John 5:18 — A Devotional

, posted by Martin Glynn

We’ve come to the conclusion of the letter. John doesn’t end with an exhorting paragraph, or a final doctrinal conclusion. Instead, he concludes with a list of loosely connected aphorisms, and by pointing to the…

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Friday Files: Wesley’s Predestination Calmly Considered

, posted by Godismyjudge

John Wesley had the rare gift of bringing the Calvinist/Arminian debate from the head to the heart. In Predestination Calmly Considered, Wesley first examines the idea of upholding unconditional election while rejecting reprobation and then…

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C.S. Lewis: Calvinist or Classical Arminian?

, posted by Kevin Jackson

Please lcik on the link to view Zach Dawes, “C. S. Lewis: Calvinist or Classical Arminian?” In this essay, Rev. Zach Dawes argues that the theology of C.S. Lewis was essentially Arminian. Dawes also maintains a blog,…

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Calminians?

, posted by Martin Glynn

I have heard many attempt to say that they are searching for a middle ground between Arminianism and Calvinism. The impetus of this is peace. They see the issue as too divisive, and they believe that by finding a middle ground, they can end the need for conflict.

Though I highly respect the sentiment, ultimately such a project will fail. There can be no middle ground between Calvinism and Arminianism. Why?

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The Farmer, the Boys, and the Pond

, posted by Kevin Jackson

In his book “Chosen but Free“, Dr. Norman Geisler* gives an illustration that vividly explains the problem with the Calvinistic teaching of Limited Atonement. Here is a paraphrase of the story: There was a farmer…

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The Early Church and Calvinism

, posted by Ben Henshaw

This is a detailed study of Calvinism in light of the earliest Christian writers (Ante-Nicene Church Fathers). It demonstrates that the primary features of Calvinism were not taught by the Ante-Nicene Fathers but were actually considered heretical by these early Christian writers (often connected to various forms of gnosticism). Numerous quotes from these Ante-Nicene writers are provided for the reader to carefully consider.

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