Hermeneutics

Matt 1:21: How Calvinists Blind Side a Text

, posted by arminianbaptist

He Will Save His People from Their Sins: How Calvinists Don’t Bother Looking from the Other Side One of the more inane proof-texts for Calvinism is Matthew 1:21: “…for he will save his people from…

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For the Sins of the Whole World

, posted by Godismyjudge

This post is an excerpt from the book review of Death of Death in the Death of Christ.

I plan on 1) presenting the passages that teach Christ died for the world, 2) presenting my argument for unlimited atonement, 3) explaining 1 John 2:1-2, 4) going into some detail on the word “world”, and 5) addressing John Owen’s counter definition.

The Text

The New Testament has 10 passages which teach Christ died for the world. 1 John 2:1-2 is one of them.

1My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous:2And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.

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Eternal Security and Exegetical Overview of Hebrews

, posted by arminianbaptist

An Attempt to Move the Issue from Prooftexting to Texts which Sustain the Argument Introduction to the Theological Debate For 500 years, much of evangelical Christianity has been split on the issue of whether a…

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Romans 3.10-18: A Midrash

, posted by

What did Paul mean when he made the statements that there is “none who seeks after God,” or that man’s “throat is an open tomb”? (Rom. 3.10-18) The majority of Calvinists are convinced that Paul…

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Are the words of Scripture precise?

, posted by Martin Glynn

Did the writers of the bible choose the words and the order of words intentionally? Yes, of course. The Bible consists of carefully constructed words. However, are the words precise? No, simply because precise words…

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The Nature of Wesleyan Theology

, posted by Kevin Jackson

The Nature of Wesleyan Theology

From the Wesleyan Theological Journal
J. Kenneth Grider

Theology, when it is entered into by us Wesleyans, takes on a certain nature, in relation to other theologies: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Anglican, Calvinist. It is of the very nature of Wesleyan theology that it has (1) an experiential interest, (2) an existential element, (3) a large-scoped biblical character, (4) a dynamic quality, (5) a catholicity, and 6) a homing instinct for the moral.

Its Experiential Interest

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Hermeneutical Model for the Wesleyan Ordo Salutis

, posted by Kevin Jackson

A HERMENEUTICAL MODEL FOR THE WESLEYAN ORDO SALUTIS

From the Wesleyan Theological Journal
Kenneth Collins

I. Introduction

It comes as a surprise to learn that in this age of ecumenism, John Wesley’s theology has rarely been explored beyond Methodist circles. Indeed, while significant dialogue has occurred among Lutheran, Calvinist and Roman Catholic traditions,1 Wesley’s voice has seldom been heard in such settings. Why has this been so?

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The New Perspective and Ephesians

, posted by SEA

The New Perspective on Paul is generally associated with a reinterpretation of Romans and Galatians, inasmuch as these two books have been most closely associated with the Old Perspective and the traditional Protestant interpretation of…

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The Machine Gun Hermeneutic

, posted by Martin Glynn

Many Calvinists have accused Arminianism as being more devoted to human philosophy than Biblical truth. I not only believe this to be false, but my experience often shows that those who make these accusations are…

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