Dort. Synod or Canons of Dort

Life after Arminius: The Arminians and Dordt

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After the death of Arminius, anti-Arminian Calvinists become emboldened, which merely attests to the place of prominence granted Arminius within his own lifetime: with Arminius still alive, the anti-Arminians find lording their doctrines over the…

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The Unjust Persecution of the Arminians

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After the death of Arminius in 1609 the Remonstrants petition the States for protection and safe conduct. Why? Why would the early Arminians fear for their physical safety? By the era of Arminius’ death in…

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Roy Ingle, “The Life of James Arminius”

, posted by SEA

Who was James (or Jacobus) Arminius? His actual name was Jacob Harmenszoon when he was born in Oudewater, Holland in 1559. His father died before his birth and thus Jacob was raised by a widowed…

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A Calvinistic Baptist Enlightened by Jacob Arminius

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A Latin expression known as ad fontes translates, literally, “to the fountains,” interpreted as “to the sources,” a command to read primary sources. Dr. Mark A. Ellis, a Calvinist pastor of a Calvinistic Baptist church,…

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The Arminian Confession of 1621

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The Remonstrants constructed their Arminian Confession of 1621 in the brief years following the conclusion of the Synod of Dort. The translator of the work below, Dr. Mark A. Ellis, states: “They intended it as…

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Christ Redeemed Faith

, posted by Godismyjudge

The Canons of Dort say Christ acquired faith for us by His death (Point 2, article 8).1  The significance of this seemly minor point is that Christ buying the condition of the covenant effectively changes the…

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Arminius’ Impact on Calvinism

, posted by Godismyjudge

[Editor’s note: It appears that the author uses the term “sublapsarian” as equivalent to the term “infralapsarian.” many use this language in that way. But some use these terms to refer to different positions.] Arminius didn’t…

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Arminius’ Nine Questions For the Synod of Dort

, posted by royingle

Arminius died in 1609, which was nine years before the Synod of Dort convened in 1618-1619. Yet it was his original ideas, teachings, and requests that led to the infamous Synod. From the writings of Arminius, it appears that he had hopes that the national synod would be a place for him to 1) defend himself against all charges of heresy, and 2) to defend his views regarding changes he saw needed in the Calvinistic confessions of faith. Arminius felt that the Scriptures were the highest authority to appeal to, and he felt that the Confessions of faith and Catechisms needed to be changed in light of clear teaching in Scripture. The Calvinists of his day disagreed and argued that the Confessions and Catechisms were the judges of what true believers should confess and believe (and it appears to me to be regardless of what Scripture said).

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The Historical Orthodoxy of Arminianism (Part One)

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Arminianism was condemned at the Synod of Dort (1618-19). And what of it? A group of supralapsarian Calvinists joined theological and political forces, calling on foreign political allies, to ruin the reputation, ministry, and systematic…

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The Calvinists Who Became Arminians at Dort

, posted by Kevin Jackson

One of the fascinating facts of history is the “conversion” to Arminianism of several of the Calvinists who participated in the proceedings at the Synod of Dort. Below are accounts of three Calvinists, two whom changed their views during the actual proceedings, and one who had already changed his opinion prior.

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Dort, Synod of

, posted by Eric Landstrom

Dort, Synod of (SYNODUS DORDRACENA), a national synod of the United Provinces, held at Dort (Dordrecht; Lat. Dordracum) in 1618-19. I. Origin of the Synod. — The opposition of James Arminius to the Augustinian and…

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Political Powerbrokers, Authority, and the Road to Dort

, posted by Eric Landstrom

The Synod of Dort was a regional conference that was primarily motivated by political powerbrokers. Theodore Beza, John Calvin’s direct successor and first systematizer of Calvinism sent Arminius, the brightest bulb in the Calvinist box…

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Synod of Dort (Part Three)

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“Because the members of the regular provincial Synods could not be long absent from their respective congregations, such galloping commissions as these, endowed with ample powers, were appointed to traverse every province in which Arminianism…

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Synod of Dort (Part Two)

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It was the “ardent wish of the Calvinists only to have the company of those choice spirits of other countries that would readily coalesce with themselves in devising measures to crush Arminianism. To obtain the…

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